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April 11, 2012
CROATS AMONG TRAVELERS
Sinking of the Titanic - 100th anniversary
The following article was published in the "Croatian Chronicle – Chicago", No. 1, Spring 2002, under the title “Sinking of the Titanic – 90th Anniversary.”  On the occasion of the 100th anniversary of the Titanic tragedy, we are bringing here the same text with a few small changes.


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April 15, 2012 marks the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the famous Titanic liner.  Among 1,316 passengers, out of which 818 died in this horrific tragedy that stunned the world, there were also a number of Croatians and/or people coming from Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina. 


People who lost their lives

FROM CROATIA


Čačić Jago/Grga, 18, single, Široka Kula, destination South Chicago, Illinois.
Čačić, Luka, 38, married, Široka Kula, destination South Chicago, Illinois.
Čačić, Manda, 21, single, Široka Kula, destination South Chicago, Illinois.
Čačić, Marija, 30, single, Široka Kula, destination South Chicago, Illinois.
Čalić, Jovo, 17, single, Breznik, destination Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan.
Čalić, Petar, 17, single, Brezik, destination Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan.
Čor, Bartol, 35, married, Kričina, destination Great Falls, Montana.
Čor, Ivan, 27, married, Kričina, destination Great Falls, Montana.
Čor, Ljudevit, 19, married, Kričina, destination St. Louis, Missouri.
Čulumović, Joso, 17, single, Lipova Glavica, destination Hammond, Indiana. (He boarded under his   "calling-name" of Ećimović.)
Dakić, Branko, 19, Gornji Miholjac, destination unknown.  His body, even if found, was never           identified.
Dika, Mirko, 17, single, Podgora (Crikvenica?), destination Vancouver, Canada.
Dimić, Jovan, 42, married, Ostrovica, destination Red Lodge, Montana.
Draženović, Josip, 33, married, Hrastelnica, destination New York, NY. His body was recovered by  the MacKay Bennett (#51) and was buried at sea on 21 April 1912. “Pipe bowl, passport, set of beads [rosary], $25.00 and 5 krones” were found on his body. (At another place it is stated that his age was 30.)
Hendeković, Ignjac, 28, married, Vagovina, destination Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.  He traveled with    Matilda Petranec.  His body was recovered by the MacKay Bennett (#306) and buried at Mount Olivet Roman Catholic Cemetery, Halifax, NS on May 10, 1912.  “One knife, purse with $12 in notes; small purse with 72 cents; two third class tickets, No. 349245 for Matilda Petram (Petranec) and No. 349243 for Toznai!! Hendeković” were found on his body.

Karajić, Milan, 30, married, Vagovina, destination Youngstown, Ohio.
Orešković, Jelka, 23, single, Konjsko Brdo, destination South Chicago, Illinois. (Boarded together      with her relatives Luka and Marija Orešković.)
Orešković, Marija, 20, single, Konjsko Brdo, destination South Chicago, Illinois. (Boarded together   with her relatives Luka and Jelka Orešković.  Marija's mother received a grant of £50 from the     Mansion House Titanic Relief Fund.
Orešković, Luka, 20, married, Konjsko Brdo, destination South Chicago, Illinois. (Boarded together with Marija and Jelka Orešković.)
Pavlović, Štefo, 32, married, Vagovina, destination Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.
Petranec, Matilda, 28, widow, Vagovina, destination Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. (Boarded with Ignjac     Hendeković.  Her ticket was found on the body of Mr Hendeković.
Pocrnić, Mate, 17, single, Bukovac, destination South Chicago, Illinois.  (Sometimes listed as "Pacruic", "Pecruic" i "Pokrnic".)
Pocrnić, Tomo, 24, married, Bukovac, destination South Chicago, Illinois.  (Sometimes listed as          "Pacruic", "Pecruic" i "Pokrnic".)
Smiljanić, Mile, 37, Pisač near Udbina, destination unknown.  His body, even if found, was never       identified.
Stanković, Ivan, 33, single, Galgovo, destination New York, NY.  Some sources on the web claim that    Stanković was in America previously.  Supposedly, after the death of his wife he returned to take care of some legal matters dealing with her inheritance, and on the way back he lost his life.
Strilić, Ivan, 27, married, Široka Kula, destination South Chicago, Illinois.
Turčin, Stjepan, 36, married, Bratina, destination Youngstown, Ohio.

To this above list we are adding also the name of a Benedictine priest, Josip Perušić (Josef Peruschitz), born in 1871, Bavaria, Germany, but who was of Croatian heritage.  He was on the way to assume the position of a principal in a Catholic High School in Minnesota.  Survivors of the Titanic tragedy witnessed how he refused to enter a safety boat in order to give others the chance to save their lives.


People who lost their lives

FROM BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA


Bakić, Kerim, 26, married, Bakić, destination Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.
Bakić, Tido?, 38, married, Bakić, Bosnia, destination Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. (Mr Bakić's last name     is often written as Rekić or Kekić, but most probably it is Bakić.)
Sivić, Husein, 40, married, Bakić, destination Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. (Sometimes listed as "Husen   Sivic".)
The bodies of the above passengers from Bosnia, even if recovered, were never identified.



CROATIAN SURVIVORS



Ivan Jalševac, age 29, from Topolovac.  He was married to Kata, who stayed behind in his native village.  He was on his way to New York, NY.  After he was rescued, however, he traveled to Galesburg, Illinois, where he had a friend, Franjo Karun.  Later, he returned to Croatia and died in 1945, according to some sources.

Nikola Lulić was born on February 24, 1883 in the village of Konjsko Brdo, Lika, Croatia.  In 1902, while serving in the Austrian Army, he deserted and immigrated to America.  He went to Chisholm, Minnesota and worked as a miner in the "Alpena Mine".  In autumn 1911, he came back to Croatia for half a year to visit his family.  At this time, he was already married for the second time.  His second wife, Marta, and his two children lived in Croatia at the time.  When it was time to go back to America he served as an unofficial companion to other immigrants who paid his ticket.  He helped them with translation and advised them of what to expect during the voyage and after their arrival in America.  He boarded the Titanic at Southampton and was on the way to Minnesota.  Mr Lulic survived the sinking and was rescued by the Carpathia.
After arriving in New York, Lulić went to his uncle Ross Rosinić at 118 Tocence (Torrence?) Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.  His Americanized name was "Nicola Lulich".  After the First World War, Lulić returned to Croatia and earned his living as a farmer, but sometimes he also worked in France as a seasonal worker between the two World Wars.
His wife Marta died long before he did, so he alone had to look after the children of his two marriages.  In his older days, he secluded himself more and more from his fellow villagers of Konjsko Brdo.  Nikola Lulić died in 1962 in Perušić, at the age of 79, in the house of his youngest daughter Mara.  (Milan Gnjatović, in his poem Potonuće broda Titanica - Narodna američka Pjesmarica. St. Louis: Ivan Sikočan, 1913, lists his name as Nikola Lukić, but it should have been Lulić.)

Mara Osman, age 31, married, from Vagovina, Croatia, boarded the Titanic at Southampton and she was going to Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.  She was rescued by the Carpathia.  After arriving in New York (June 18, 1912), she went to her sister, Mrs. Rudolph Paulovich, at Steelton, Pennsylvania.  (The Immigration Officer incorrectly lists her as single woman and her nationality as Polish.  She is also listed sometimes as "Maria Osman".  Gnjatović, in his above mentioned poem, lists her as one of the three Croatian survivors.)
Some sources tell us that she was born in 1881 and she married Miško Banski in 1904.  They had a son, Franjo. (Other sources state that they had three sons.)  Whatever the case, it seems that she left her husband and went to America, traveling under her maiden name, Osman.  Later, her son Franjo joined her in the US and he died in California in 1980.  Mara eventually remarried and, supposedly, she died in Wisconsin in 1938.  Details about her life in America are not know to us.

 

sent by: Ante Čuvalo
www.cuvalo.net







 

 

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